Still more lazy thoughts from this one…

Posts from the ‘song’ category

Don't Worry Baby

Same Song, Different Movie: Don’t Worry Baby by Brian Wilson & Roger Christian

Sharing similarities in key and melody with the famous Phil Spector-produced work, Don’t Worry Baby was primarily about duos. The singer about to race a rival, drag racing in relevance to his girlfriend, and the heart and soul relationship existing between the girl and singer. It’s why, after a good number of years, the song continues to work well with lovers. In this case, Wilson’s longtime hit from 1964 was used in a tender, harmonious context for two different movies, song versions, and the manner deployed in a pair of scenes.

harold melvin & the bluenotes

A Song For This Day (and year): Wake Up Everybody

In honor of the New Year now upon us, I selected another song from the Ye ‘Ol Decade of the 1970s to christen 2014. Wake Up Everybody (1975) was Harold Melvin & the Blue Notes’ last Top 40 hit. The smooth and soulful lead vocal was performed by none other than Teddy Pendergrass, in one of last numbers with the group.

the-beatles_tomorrow_never_knows

Reprise » “It Is Believing”

Back to the vital things in life. Besides movie-watching and reading, it’s music for me. A shared facet that my colleague Kevin highlighted last week. Though I’ve put a turntable back into my life (thereby forcing me to re-collect those LPs I thoughtlessly let go more than two decades ago, to my wife’s consternation), listening to my Compact Disc collection has taken up much of my non-work-movie-book listening time.

Blue_Oyster_Cult_1977_publicity_photo

Same Song, Different Movie: (Don’t Fear) The Reaper by Buck Dharma

Built almost entirely around Roeser’s stellar guitar riff — it being the one song I taught my children how to air guitar as toddlers (much to their mother’s chagrin) — the track has gathered fans from each subsequent decade thereafter. Certainly, enough to collect movie acclaim over the years. If you listened to the lyrics carefully, that is. Two of which utilized the driving barre chords and the poetry of the lyrics to great effect from two distinct and contrary decades. The tune reverberated best in a pair of films from the 70s and 90s in striking backdrops by two wholly different directors dealing with death in their films.

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